What is needed to apply Lean to the rail industry?

During my time with VolkerRail they were one of the first companies to look at how LEAN can be applied to the rail industry.
This meant starting from scratch, there is no one to copy.
Below I have tried to help you understand what type of issues come to light when looking through ‘LEAN Goggles’ at the track renewals process.

Excavation of spent ballast

When excavating the old ballast we start at one end (usually) and work through to the other. We may use one or two machines to do a rough dig, then use one machine with a dozer to trim to the finished level.
This causes waste, waste in the Lean sense rather than the more conventional sense, i.e. those activities in the process not adding value. For the example described above the following wastes exist:

Reworks as a result of a defect – using the dozer and another machine to complete the dig means we are effectively doing the dig twice.
Unnecessary motion – each time the machine working with the dozer lifts a bucket of spoil to the train it is unnecessary if the first dig had been done properly.
Inventory – the area of the dig between the first rough dig and the trim can be considered to be inventory, this area is not having any value added to it.
Defects – associated with the above point we don’t know if the rough dig is right until the dozer gets to it, perhaps the area has been over dug and is now too deep?
Inventory again – the area behind the dozer does not get any ballast dropped on it until the dozer has gone all the way through.
Transport – the dozer now needs to travel all the way back to the beginning, this is waste as is the fact the first area to be dozed has been waiting to be worked on again.

You are probably reading this thinking, ‘Yeah but the train needs to move.’, or ‘We cannot afford to have two dozers’, or ‘It would be too slow to do the whole dig in one go.’ Well yes, that is how it is now, but how could it be in the future?
Could there be a machine that can complete the dig in one pass? Could we have new trains that can take away old ballast and bring in new ballast at the same time?
This is what is meant by the term ‘LEAN Goggles’ when one learns to use these one sees things in a completely new way. It can be quite frightening.

LEAN in action

One example of attempting to improve how the track renewal process works can be seen in the experiments using a Road Planer to excavate spent ballast.

Very good cut following excavation with planer
Very good cut following excavation with planer


The trial was used to understand if the machine could improve the speed and quality of the excavation phase of a track renewal project. Excavation had, for a long time, been a process which took a large proportion of the renewal possession, and the quality was variable at best.
The planer produced a very good quality cut but with only one machine the work rate was not perceived to be great, especially considering that several passes were required to achieve the correct excavation depth and width.
Planer loading to wagons
Planer loading to wagons

So why has this idea not been taken further? Perhaps there exists a reluctance to change, perhaps without constant pushing people do what they have always done. But perhaps there is no real data to prove which technique is best. We need to have real data to compare outputs and quality.

We also need to have the vision to enhance the existing equipment to make it do what we want to do more precisely. The next steps for the planer were quite obvious, work them in multiple, or use a wider drum and some changes to the chute to stop it betting clogged in very poor ballast conditions.
Link the laser levelling equipment to the hydraulics, so the idea is not dead, just waiting to be taken forward again.

This solution does not provide a solution to all the wastes listed above, but perhaps it forms part of the new solution, however that may look.

A final look at Manchester Metro

The metro is back up and running and appears to be working well.

There do not appear to be any major problems, and it is difficult to believe all the work that has been done to get it up and running again.

Here are a few photos from around Shudehill, they are a little blurry but they were taken in the dark.

Looking from Shudehill towards High Street
Looking from Shudehill towards High Street

Shudehill Station
Shudehill Station

View towards Victoria from Shudehill Station
View towards Victoria from Shudehill Station

Shudehill Station, again
Shudehill Station, again

A little rant about ticket barriers, again!

Are ticket barrier really necessary?

Yesterday I was travelling back from London on the 15:30 train from St Pancras. A ticket barrier is now in operation at St Pancras and so I begrudgingly got my ticket out of my wallet, holding my coat, bag and a file in the other. Successfully through the barrier I found a seat, got out my laptop and settle down to prepare some notes from the meeting I had attended.

Seconds after we departed we were advised that a fully ticket inspection would now take place. Hang on a minute, I had just passed the challenge of getting my ticket in the machine whilst juggling the rest of my gear, now my ticket was to be inspected again. What is going on!

I decided to ask.

The Train Manager/Ticket Inspector came to our carriage and I raised my concern that my ticket had been checked by the barrier and now she was checking it again.

She explained that the machines are a bit useless for the following reasons:

  • They cannot check the validity of a Railcard,
  • They cannot check the validity of a Railcard,
  • They are a bit crap at letting the correct advance purchase tickets on to the correct train,
  • They cannot deal with self print tickets,
  • And the staff don’t have a lot of faith in them.
  • The introduction of the barriers at St Pancras has meant that staff have stopped checking all tickets at the end of the platform and now check them on board, actually occupying a member of staff that was previously free to look after customers rather than inconvenience them further. It was clear she was not very impressed with the installation of the barriers.

    I have stated in a previous blog that I hate ticket barriers they are an expensive, and if this is to be believed, an ineffective way of protecting revenue for the TOC. They offer virtually no benefit to the customer and are a hindrance to anyone carrying more than an umbrella.

    I do not however have the same hatred of the Oyster Card system on the underground. Perhaps this is because it seems to be simpler to operate with hands full of baggage and I don’t have to queue to by a ticket before hand. Or maybe it is just that checking tickets on a metro system is very difficult and so the barriers make more sense.

    Either way my dislike of ticket barriers grows.

    I wish the industry would look at the whole journey experience and stop putting barriers (literally) in the way to people using trains.

    Luton Station

    The joys of contracting take me to Peterborough for a project at Luton.
     
    I am now doing some work for Jarvis, planning an S&C renewal at Luton North Junction and the permanent way works necessary to remodel the platforms.
    This is quite a complicated project, with our p-way works comprising a part of it.

    Looking towards the station.
    Looking towards the station.

    Yes I am behind the barrier!
    Yes I am behind the barrier!

    These photos are from a fenced green zone set up by the civils guys to build the new foundations for the new OLE masts.
    The track is to be realigned over the bridge to allow the platforms to be lengthened to the north.
    Luton North Junction is to the north of here, but access is not good due to the curves through the bridges and into the station.
     
    The areas shown in these photos are due to be relaid in Week 1 with the works on the Junction spread over Week 4 and Week 6.

    A little bit of a tribute to Brunel

    Nadine and I have recently been on holiday down in Cornwall.
    On our journey around the bottom Left hand corner of the British Isles we visited several sites associated with Brunel.
    Here are a few photos for those that like this sort of thing.

    SS Great Britain
    SS Great Britain

    Clifton Suspension Bridge
    Clifton Suspension Bridge

    Clifton Suspension Bridge
    Clifton Suspension Bridge

    Royal Albert Bridge in the rail!
    Royal Albert Bridge in the rail!

    All rather impressive, especially considering when and how they were built.